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Modern motherhood breathes fire – Intandem

“We are all  ‘Mother.’  We are the stewards of our planet and we are working together to resolve these intersecting issues.”            

– Kim Baker, Lifeskills Manager

Kim and Ashleigh at Women's marchΜotherhood is an idyllic, radiant ray of humanity’s most beautiful primal drive. It is the expression of unconditional love while nurturing the vulnerable and helpless infant in the predatory jungle of life.

While instinctual, these qualities of upholding, supporting, nurturing, and embracing those who are vulnerable are among the best qualities of evolved humanity.  One doesn’t need to be a mother to support the voiceless and marginalized. This fact was never more evident than during the Women’s March on January 21 which was one of the largest marches in history drawing more than 4 million participants in cities across the U.S. in addition to Washington, D.C.

Kim Baker, who is the manager of the Agency’s Lifeskills department, and her daughter, Ashleigh, both of whom have a history of supporting the disabled and marginalized, including environment and conditions in the third world, marched in Washington.

“The entire globe moved on Saturday. They marched in Antarctica, in France and Alaska,” Kim posted on Facebook regarding the march.

“Today I marched for my family, each of my friends, their children and grandchildren, for people with disabilities, the LGBTQIA Community, our environment, for human rights, for comprehensive affordable health care and so much more. And, I did it with the most important person in my life. My daughter.”K & A

They marched to defend the most marginalized among us. They marched for racial justice, for families and education, equality and respect, religious freedom, anti- xenophobia, gender-based violence, LGBTQIA rights, safety and security for immigrants and support for people with disabilities. “Those are the things that brought me to the march.” Kim said,

“Ashleigh and I talk about world issues, things people need help with, and the barriers they face. Sometimes those barriers are just ridiculous.”

“Those are the things that brought me to the march.” Kim said, “Ashleigh and I talk about world issues, things people need help with, and the barriers they face. Sometimes those barriers are just ridiculous.”

Victims are often voiceless. The child forced to wed, the abused who risk greater injury if they talk or try to defend themselves, the human who could have those basic needs met if the program had funding. Even Western countries socialize women to be passive, demure, and conflict avoidant, which also makes it difficult for them to address issues.

“This was a global opportunity to address needs, advocate, and to remind the world that these things exist even though they may not impact us individually. For people to know we have not forgotten them.”

“We are all ‘Mother.’ We are the stewards of our planet and we are working together to resolve these intersecting issues.

“On this Mother’s Day, I wish for my daughter to be able to walk into any room, in any country, in any culture and be respected as an intelligent, autonomous being. I want for all the voiceless, invisible, and disempowered to ‘believe they can breathe fire’,” Kim said, quoting Jessica Kirkland.